Activity Introduction

Activity details: Students choose an issue related to biodiversity that needs serious attention. They use their understanding of biodiversity to describe the issue and how their potential solutions might resolve the issue. Students demonstrate that an understanding of biodiversity is essential if conservation is going to be effective. 

Learning goals for this activity include:

1. Understanding biodiversity helps to understand conservation issues and find potential solutions.

2. Evaluating people’s claims about an issue on the basis of supporting scientific evidence.

Module: Biodiversity

Year levels: 9 and 10

Indoor or outdoor activity: Indoor

Duration of activity: 120 mins

Learning areas addressed: Science, Geography, English.

Teacher input: Facilitate class discussion. 

Resources needed: Internet access.

Homework and extension opportunities: Some of the research and writing can be done at home.

Keywords: Biodiversity, ecosystem, solutions, communication. 

Australian Curriculum Link:

Year 9 Science:

  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS170)
  • Critically analyse the validity of information in secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems (ACSIS172)

Year 9 English:

  • Interpret, analyse and evaluate how different perspectives of issue, event, situation, individuals or groups are constructed to serve specific purposes in texts (ACELY1742)

Year 10 Science:

  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS204)
  • Critically analyse the validity of information in secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems (ACSIS206)

Year 10 English:

  • Use comprehension strategies to compare and contrast information within and between texts, identifying and analysing embedded perspectives, and evaluating supporting evidence (ACELY1754)

Syllabus OutcomesSC5-8WS, SC5-7WSEN5-2A

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Ongoing scientific research is essential for understanding the status of plants, animals, ecosystems and the total genetic diversity. The scientific knowledge obtained is needed to develop conservation programs. Trying to restore or protect biodiversity can be controversial.

Almost all Australians would agree that koalas need our protection. Populations in Queensland and northern NSW seem to be declining. Populations in some areas in Victoria and SA are high and damaging their food trees. There are diseases affecting other populations of koalas. Urban development in Queensland is being blamed on the population decline. So while we might all agree that koalas should be protected, we can’t agree on how to protect them. When it comes to disease, we probably don’t have the resources to protect them.

Activity

Students choose a biodiversity issue to research. They need to provide in-depth scientific evidence to support their view about the best options for solving the issue. 

There are

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Student Worksheet

Activity
You are going to research a major biodiversity issue. Your job is to collect in depth scientific evidence to support your view about the best options for solving the issue. 

Examples of biodiversity issues divided into categories

1. What solutions are needed to restore the ecology of the Murray Darling basin?

2. Should kangaroos be culled?

3. Should introduced trees in our cities be replaced with native trees?

4. How much forest area should be burned off each year in an effort to reduce bushfire risks? (Do prescribed burns reduce bushfire risks?)

Examples of issues that no one talks about;

1. How do we reduce the amount of wildlife killed on the road?

2. Why don’t we plant local (indigenous) plants in our urban parks?

3. Why is there a higher density of brushtail possums in many suburbs and some parks compared to the bush?

4. How should stray cats be controlled?

Examples of issues almost everyone in Australia agrees on (although solutions may be controversial):

1.

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