Activity Introduction

Quick summary: This activity ties together all the learnings from the cool burning unit. The aim of this activity is for students to create a shared vision of the future for Australia’s tropical savannas. Students create this vision using a ‘thinking hats’ learning tool and consider a range of opinions and perspectives. They identify the cultural, economic and environmental aspects of their shared vision.

General Capabilities: Critical and creative thinking, personal and social capability.

Learning goals:

  • Students understand the cultural, economic and environmental benefits of putting Indigenous Australians’ land management strategies into practice.
  • Students find out that science can be used to make predictions about our future.
  • Students recognise that they have the skills and knowledge to create their own vision for the future.
  • Students understand that different people have opposing ideas about what the future should look like but that these differences can be used to give strength to the vision and its meaning.

Australian Curriculum content description:

Year 7 English: 

  • Reflect on ideas and opinions about characters, settings and events in literary texts, identifying areas of agreement and difference with others and justifying a point of view (ACELT1620).
  • Discuss aspects oftexts, for example their aesthetic and social value, using relevant and appropriate metalanguage(ACELT1803)
  •  Use comprehension strategies to interpret, analyse and synthesise ideas and information, critiquing ideas and issues from a variety of textual sources (ACELY1723)
  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, selecting aspects of subject matter and particular language, visual, and audio features to convey information and ideas (ACELY1725)

Year 8 English: 

  • Share, reflect on, clarify and evaluate opinions and arguments about aspects of literary texts(ACELT1627)
  • Recognise and explain differing viewpoints about the world, cultures, individual people and concerns represented in texts(ACELT1807)
  • Use comprehension strategies to interpret and evaluate texts by reflecting on the validity of content and the credibility of sources, including finding evidence in the text for the author’s point of view (ACELY1734)
  • Create imaginative, informative and persuasive texts that raise issues, report events and advance opinions, using deliberate language and textual choices, and including digital elements as appropriate (ACELY1736)

Year 9 Science

  • Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (ACSHE157)
  • People can use scientific knowledge to evaluate whether they should accept claims, explanations or predictions (ACSHE160)
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations (ACSIS174)

Year 9 English

  • Use interaction skills to present and discuss an idea and to influence and engage an audience by selecting persuasive language, varying voice tone, pitch, and pace, and using elements such as music and sound effects (ACELY1811)
  • Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content and multimodal elements for aesthetic and playful purposes (ACELY1741)
  • Interpret, analyse and evaluate how different perspectives of issue, event, situation, individuals or groups are constructed to serve specific purposes in texts (ACELY1742)
  • Create imaginative, informative and persuasive texts that present a point of view and advance or illustrate arguments, including texts that integrate visual, print and/or audio features (ACELY1746)
  •  Use a range of software, including word processing programs, flexibly and imaginatively to publish texts (ACELY1748)

Year 10 Science

  • Global systems, including the carbon cycle, rely on interactions involving the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere (ACSSU189)
  • Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (ACSHE191)
  • People can use scientific knowledge to evaluate whether they should accept claims, explanations or predictions (ACSHE194)
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations (ACSIS208)

Year 10 Geography

  • The human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability (ACHGK070)
  • The environmental worldviews of people and their implications for environmental management (ACHGK071)
  • The application of environmental economic and social criteria in evaluating management responses to the change (ACHGK075)
  • Reflect on and evaluate the findings of the inquiry to propose individual and collective action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations; and explain the predicted outcomes and consequences of their proposal (ACHGS080)
  • Present findings, arguments and explanations in a range of appropriate communication forms selected for their effectiveness and to suit audience and purpose, using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies as appropriate (ACHGS079)

Syllabus OutcomesGE5-2, GE5-3, GE5-4, GE5-5, GE5-8SC5-12ES, SC5-13ES, SC5-9WSEN4-2A, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-8D, EN5-1A. EN5-2A, EN5-3B.

Topic: Cool burning

Time required: 60 mins

Level of teacher scaffolding: Low – oversee activity

Resources required: Internet access, students worksheet, Cool Burning Digital ToolboxFact Sheet – Benefits of cool burnsFact Sheet – How do Indigenous Australians use fire?Fact Sheet – Carbon credits and carbon trading

Digital technology opportunities: Online brainstorming tools (e.g. bubbl.us or mindmeister), presentation or infographic tools (e.g. PowerPoint, Prezi or Piktochart), digital sharing capabilities. DIY infographic background information.

Keywords:  Indigenous, Aboriginal, tradition, culture, land management, career, employment, social benefits, social benefits, grazing, carbon credits, conservation, climate change

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.  

Special thanks to:

Fish River Station, John Daly, Dr Jeremy Russell-Smith, Peter Jacklyn, Peter McConchie, Dr Tommy George, David Claudie, Dale Musgrave, Carolyn George and Victor Steffensen.

Made possible by:

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

 

 

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

climate-changeTeacher preparation:

Overarching learning goal: This activity ties together all the concepts learned through the study of the cool burning unit. The aim of this activity is for students to create a shared vision of the future for Australia's tropical savannas. This vision should be one that includes a range of viewpoints and opinions. Most importantly, this is an activity that gives the students the opportunity to think about what kind of future they would like to create for themselves and for future generations of Australians.

Teacher content information: You may remember that in 2008 the Rudd government hosted an event called the 2020 Summit. It brought together a range of people from different sectors to 'help shape a long term strategy for the nation's future'. Most of us are used to governments and policy makers designing the future for us, so the idea of engaging the general public in creating a vision of the future is a very powerful notion, especially in the face of the bad n

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: how can we create a shared vision of the future?

Step 1: John's vision

John Daly is an Indigenous Australian ranger from Fish River. Watch the video below and write down what you think his vision of the future would look like.

VIDEO 1: Benefits for community - http://vimeo.com/79463044

1. Write a summary of John's vision for the future.

How do you think it would look when put into practice?

2. On which points do you agree with his vision?

 

Step 2: Our vision for the tropical savanna of Australia

Your group is to begin planning the future that you would like to see, in the context of managing the tropical savanna areas of Australia. The role of each group member is to take the position of one 'hat'. Each group member should be assigned a 'hat', a perspective from which to view and respond to the issue. Read the hat descriptions below.

White Hat - Finding out the facts. With the White Hat you focus on the data available. Look

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