Activity Introduction

shark-frame-260x300 fixedQuick summary: Students are asked to consider one of the most controversial debates in wildlife management: Should a Great White Shark that poses a risk to humans be killed to protect human lives? Students will be asked to research and debate this issue.

Earth Hour LogoFollowing this lesson plan is an ideal way for your school to take part in Earth Hour. You’ll be joining thousands of amazing teachers in making a difference and creating positive environmental change.

 

Learning goals:

  • Students understand that culling sharks is a highly contentious issue.
  • Students understand that there are powerful arguments for and against shark culling.
  • Students understand that debating can be used to give proponents for both sides of a contentious issue the opportunity to present their case.

General capabilities: Literacy, Critical and creative thinking, Ethical understanding.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.2, OI.4, OI.7.

Australian Curriculum content description:

Year 7 English

  • Use interaction skills when discussing and presenting ideas and information, selecting body language, voice qualities and other elements, (for example music and sound) to add interest and meaning (ACELY1804)
  • Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content and multimodal elements to promote a point of view or enable a new way of seeing (ACELY1720)

Year 8 English

  • Use interaction skills for identified purposes, using voice and language conventions to suit different situations, selecting vocabulary, modulating voice and using elements such as music, images and sound for specific effects (ACELY1808)
  • Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content, including multimodal elements, to reflect a diversity of viewpoints (ACELY1731)

Syllabus Outcomes: EN4-4B, EN4-3B

Topic: Biodiversity

Time required: 48 mins

Level of teacher scaffolding: Low – Assist in researching material and oversee debate.

Resources required: Internet access, student worksheet, writing materials.

Digital technology opportunities: Internet based research, digital sharing capabilities.

Homework and extension opportunities: Reflection activities can be extended as homework.

Keywords: Shark, culling, debate.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

great-barrier-reef-biodiversity-hero-260x300 fixedTeacher preparation:

Overarching learning goal: Students understand that culling sharks is a highly contentious issue and recognise that there are powerful arguments for and against shark culling. Students also understand that debating can be used to give proponents for both sides of a contentious issue the opportunity to present their case.

Teacher content information: Sharks culling is a very emotive issue: there are those who would rather see them removed from the ocean so as to remove the threat of shark attacks for all humans; and there are those who believe that sharks have a role to play in our environment and because their numbers are declining they need to be protected, not culled.

Student and classroom organisation:

Step 1. Begin this activity by asking students to write a statement their position on shark culling using the student worksheet. The statement should explain why they are for or against shark culling.

Step 2. Break your class into two groups and ask each grou

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter - How do sharks float?

Opening statement

What is your position on shark culling? Are you for or against shark culling? Why? Write a statement that describes and justifies your position:

 

The debate

Debate guidelines

  • Each team will have at least 3 speakers.
  • Each team member should speak for 2 minutes each.
  • Other non-speaking team members should provide supporting notes and materials to speakers throughout the debate.
  • The teacher decides which team has won the debate.

Conducting the debate

1. The first team will be arguing for the AFFIRMATIVE. They should:

  • Define the topic.
  • Present the affirmative's team line.
  • Outline briefly what each speaker in their team will talk about.
    Present the first half of the affirmative case.

2. The second team will be arguing for the NEGATIVE. They should:

  • Present the negative team line.
  • Outline briefly what each of the negative speakers will say.
  • Rebut a few of the main points of the first affirmative speaker.
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