Activity Introduction

Quick summary: In this activity students look at a range of the Earths components and participate in an activity designed to demonstrate how all these components are connected. Students will then represent these relationships with a graphic organiser and present this to the class.

Learning goals:

  • Students recognise the components of the Earth.
  • Students understand how the components of the Earth relate to each other.

Australian Curriculum content description:

Year 5 Science

  • Living things have structural features and adaptations that help them to survive in their environment (ACSSU043)
  • Construct and use a range of representations, including tables and graphs, to represent and describe observations, patterns or relationships in data using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS090)
  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS093)

Year 6 Science

  • The growth and survival of living things are affected by the physical conditions of their environment (ACSSU094)
  • Construct and use a range of representations, including tables and graphs, to represent and describe observations, patterns or relationships in data using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS107)
  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS110)

Syllabus outcomes: ST3-4WS, ST3-10LW, ST3-11LW.

Topic: The Earth Wins

Time required: 60 mins

Level of teacher scaffolding: Low – oversee activity.

Resources required: Printed worksheet (click here or ask students to create their own) and scissors for each group, ball of string for each group.

Digital technology opportunities: Digital sharing capabilities.

Homework and extension opportunities: None.

Keywords: Earth, components, relationships.

 

This lesson was created in collaboration with Helifilms to support learning from the film.

Would you like to bring your class to see The Earth Wins? It’s now available ‘on-demand’ to teachers across Australia. To register your interest, simply email [email protected], mention how many students you’re likely to bring and your ideal date/time for a screening. We’ll look into bringing THE EARTH WINS to a cinema close to you… wherever you may be in Australia.

 

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher preparation:

Overarching learning goal: Students look at a range of the Earths components and participate in an activity designed to demonstrate how all these components are connected. Students will then represent these relationships with a graphic organiser and present this to the class.

Teacher content information: Teacher content information: This activity draws on concepts and footage from the film; The Earth Wins. Click here to visit The Earth Wins website.

Student and classroom organisation:

Step 1. Ask students to think about the question "What are the components of the Earth?" and to suggest answers in a class discussion.

Step 2. Break the class into groups of 10 and give each group a copy of the worksheet cut into 10 cards (click here to download the worksheet or ask students to create their own). Give each group a ball of string and ask them to move to an open space. Ask each student to select one component to represent. They must then find other components that

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Student Worksheet

Click here to download the worksheet with the 10 components.

Which component has the most connections?

Component

Number of connections

Soil

Water

Atmosphere

Minerals

Plants

Oxygen

Ocean

Animals

Ice

Oil

 

 

Work with your group to answer the following questions:

 

Which component has the most connections and why?

 

Which one has the least and why?

 

 

Reflections - Answer the following questions about this activity:

What happens if one of the components of the Earth is weakened and can't support all its connections? Pick one example and explain.

What can we do to help protect this component from decay or decline?

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