Activity Introduction

Quick summary: $20 Boss is an entrepreneurship program for secondary school students. It builds enterprise skills and teaches students how to be entrepreneurial. In this lesson, students will develop a survey that will help them to understand their target customer. They will work in teams in the ‘Marshmallow Challenge’ in which they will flex their creative muscles. Students’ creativity will then be applied to designing and prototyping the product or service of their business. They will then reflect on the value of prototyping a new product.

 

Foundation for Young Australians logo

This lesson has been developed in partnership with the Foundation for Young Australians. 
FYA is all about backing the next generation of young people who are going to rethink the world and create a better future.

 

Learning intentions
Students will:

  • understand why the customer needs to be at the centre of product/service design
  • understand the product/service design process and importance of prototyping

Enterprise skills in action:

CommunicationCreativity and innovationCritical thinking
  Digital literacy Presentation skillsTeamwork 


Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions:
HASS – Economics and Business
Year 7

  • The ways consumers and producers interact and respond to each other in the market (ACHEK017)
  • Develop questions about an economic or business issue or event, and plan and conduct an investigation or project (ACHES021)
  • Gather relevant data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES022)
  • Generate a range of alternatives in response to an observed economic or business issue or event, and evaluate the potential costs and benefits of each alternative (ACHES024)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar and new situations (ACHES025)
  • Present evidence-based conclusions using economics and business language and concepts in a range of appropriate formats, and reflect on the consequences of alternative actions (ACHES026)

Year 8

  • Types of businesses and the ways that businesses respond to opportunities in Australia (ACHEK030)
  • Develop questions about an economic or business issue or event, and plan and conduct an investigation or project (ACHES032)
  • Generate a range of alternatives in response to an observed economic or business issue or event, and evaluate the potential costs and benefits of each alternative (ACHES035)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar and new situations (ACHES036)
  • Present evidence-based conclusions using economics and business language and concepts in a range of appropriate formats, and reflect on the consequences of alternative actions (ACHES037)

Year 9

  • The nature of innovation and how and why businesses seek to create and maintain a competitive advantage in the market, including the global market (ACHEK041)
  • Develop questions and hypotheses about an economic or business issue or event, and plan and conduct an investigation (ACHES043)
  • Gather relevant and reliable data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES044)
  • Generate a range of viable options in response to an economic or business issue or event, use cost-benefit analysis and appropriate criteria to recommend and justify a course of action and predict the potential consequences of the proposed action (ACHES046)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations (ACHES047)
  • Present reasoned arguments and evidence-based conclusions in a range of appropriate formats using economics and business conventions, language and concepts (ACHES048)

Year 10

  • Develop questions and hypotheses about an economic or business issue or event, and plan and conduct an investigation (ACHES055)
  • Gather relevant and reliable data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES056)
  • Generate a range of viable options in response to an economic or business issue or event, use cost-benefit analysis and appropriate criteria to recommend and justify a course of action and predict the potential consequences of the proposed action (ACHES058)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations (ACHES059)
  • Present reasoned arguments and evidence-based conclusions in a range of appropriate formats using economics and business conventions, language and concepts (ACHES060)

Syllabus outcomes: C4.1, C4.2, C4.4, C4.7, C5.1, C5.2, C5.4, C5.7

General capabilities: Literacy, Numeracy, Critical and Creative Thinking, Personal and Social Capability.

Relevant parts of Year 7 achievement standards: Students explain the importance of short- and long-term planning to individual and business success and identify different strategies that may be used. They describe the characteristics of successful businesses and explain how entrepreneurial capabilities contribute to this success.
Relevant parts of Year 8 achievement standards: Students explain why different types of businesses exist and describe the different ways businesses can respond to opportunities in the market.
Relevant parts of Year 9 achievement standards: Students explain why businesses seek to create a competitive advantage, including through innovation, and evaluate the strategies that may be used. 
Relevant parts of Year 10 achievement standards: Students analyse factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions and explain the short- and long-term effects of these decisions. They explain how businesses respond to changing economic conditions.

Topic: Enterprise Learning.

Unit of work: $20 Boss.

Time required: 90 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – facilitate student activities and associated debriefs.

Resources required: Student Worksheets – one copy per student. Device capable of presenting a video to the class. Target Market Profile handout, Analysing Market Research Response handout.

Materials for the Marshmallow Challenge:

  • Spaghetti (20 sticks per team)
  • String (1 metre per team)
  • Scissors (1 set per team)
  • Standard sized marshmallows (1 per team)
  • Masking tape (1 metre per team)
  • Bag for carrying each team’s ‘ingredients’
  • Timing device
  • 1 x measuring tape
  • Optional: prize/s for the winning team

You’ll need a few other things to run $20 Boss in your school:

Keywords: Design thinking, target customer, prototype, enterprise skills, ideation, creativity, 21st century skills, innovation, entrepreneur, group work, team, project based learning, real-world learning, financial literacy, $20 Boss, Foundation for Young Australians, New Work Order, job skills.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

 Teacher preparation

Learning intentions
Students will:

  • understand why the customer needs to be at the centre of product/service design
  • understand the product/service design process and importance of prototyping

Success criteria
Students can

  • identify the characteristics of their target customer
  • consult their potential customers for feedback on their product/service idea
  • create a prototype of their product/service

Teacher content information: $20 Boss is an immersive entrepreneurship program for secondary school students. Students use $20 of start-up capital to create, launch and operate their venture over the course of a school term. Teachers are supported through a comprehensive toolkit that enables end-to-end delivery in the classroom. All materials are aligned to the Australian Curriculum. The $20 Boss program is the largest entrepreneurship program in Australia. In just three years over 27,750 students across Australia in over 500 secondary schools have p

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: “Genius is 1 percent inspiration, and 99 percent perspiration.” - Thomas Edison

1. Note down what you remember after watching the $20 Boss lesson introduction video here:

2. Draw your version of the prototyping cycle diagram here:

Reflection

Assess your learning throughout the lesson by responding to the following questions:

  • Why is it important to learn as much as you can about your target customer?

  • How can you find out what your target customer wants?

  • What is the value of a prototype?

 

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