Activity Introduction

Quick summary: In this Social Action lesson students develop an idea to improve liveability for young people in their community. They begin by looking at why it is important to engage the community when undertaking urban development projects. They then design and conduct a survey to find out what is important to young people in their community. Using the data collected in this survey, students then work in groups to develop an idea for improving liveability in their community. They test their ideas using a Thinking Hats role-play activity, and refine their ideas before sharing with their peers and the community.

Lesson developed in partnership with the UrbanGrowth NSW Development Corporation.

 

Learning intention:

  • Students will articulate in their own words why it is important to engage a community in urban development. 
  • Students will engage in a process of community consultation. 
  • Students will analyse survey data to improve liveability for young people in their community.

21st century skills:

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions:

Year 7 Geography

  • Factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places (ACHGK043)
  • Strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe (ACHGK047)
  • Develop geographically significant questions and plan an inquiry, using appropriate geographical methodologies and concepts (ACHGS047)
  • Evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness and select, collect and record relevant geographical data and information, using ethical protocols, from appropriate primary and secondary sources (ACHGS048)
  • Represent data in a range of appropriate forms, for example climate graphs, compound column graphs, population pyramids, tables, field sketches and annotated diagrams, with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies (ACHGS049)
  • Apply geographical concepts to draw conclusions based on the analysis of the data and information collected (ACHGS052)
  • Reflect on their learning to propose individual and collective action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations, and predict the expected outcomes of their proposal (ACHGS054)

Year 8 Geography

  • Develop geographically significant questions and plan an inquiry using appropriate geographical methodologies and concepts (ACHGS055)
  • Evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness and select, collect and record relevant geographical data and information, using ethical protocols, from appropriate primary and secondary sources (ACHGS056)
  • Represent data in a range of appropriate forms, for example, climate graphs, compound column graphs, population pyramids, tables, field sketches and annotated diagrams, with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies (ACHGS057)
  • Apply geographical concepts to draw conclusions based on the analysis of data and information collected (ACHGS060)
  • Reflect on their learning to propose individual and collective action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations, and predict the expected outcomes of their proposal (ACHGS062)

Syllabus outcomes: Stage 4 Geography

Students will:

  • locate and describe the diverse features and characteristics of a range of places and environments (GE4-1)
  • describe processes and influences that form and transform places and environments (GE4-2)
  • explain how interactions and connections between people, places and environments result in change (GE4-3)
  • examine perspectives of people and organisations on a range of geographical issues (GE4-4)
  • discuss management of places and environments for their sustainability (GE4-5)
  • explain differences in human wellbeing (GE4-6)
  • acquire and process geographical information by selecting and using geographical tools for inquiry (GE4-7)
  • communicate geographical information using a variety of strategies (GE4-8)

General capabilities: Critical and creative thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.5.

Relevant parts of Year 7 Geography achievement standards: Students describe how the characteristics of places are perceived and valued differently. They explain interconnections between people and places and environments and describe how these interconnections change places and environments. They describe alternative strategies to a geographical challenge referring to environmental, economic and social factors. Students identify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to locate useful information and data. They record and represent data and the location and distribution of geographical phenomena in a range of forms, and propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and describe the expected effects of their proposal.

Relevant parts of Year 8 Geography achievement standards: Students identify geographically significant questions from observations to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to locate useful and reliable information and data. They select, record and represent data and the location and distribution of geographical phenomena in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, and propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and predict the outcomes of their proposal.

Topics: Sustainability, Social issues.

Unit of work: The Bays – Year 7 to 8.

Time required: 290+ minutes

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – facilitate discussions, lead students through ideation and prototyping activities.

Resources required: Student Worksheet – one copy per student. Device capable of presenting a website to the class. A class set of the Survey Design Factsheet and the Thinking Hats Worksheet. Sticky notes and pens. Optional: A class set of the Project Planning Tool.

Keywords: The Bays, liveability, young people, community, social action, survey.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher preparation

Learning intentions: Students will...

  • ... articulate in their own words why it is important to engage a community in urban development. 
  • ... engage in a process of community consultation. 
  • ... analyse survey data to improve liveability for young people in their community.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • ... critically appraise the benefits of/not engaging community consultation.
  • ... design and conduct a survey.
  • ... use SMART criteria to analyse and select an idea.
  • ... work collaboratively.
  • ... actively participate in a role-play activity (Thinking Hats).

Teacher content information: Sitting just two kilometres west of the Sydney CBD, The Bays comprises 5.5 kilometres of harbour front, 95 hectares of largely government-owned land and 94 hectares of waterways in Sydney Harbour. Over the next 20 to 30 years The Bays will be renewed into a bustling hub of enterprise, activity and beautiful spaces. Located within the iconic Sydney Harbour, th

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: What three words would you use to describe the area you live in, in terms of liveability?

Community Consultation

When developers and planners develop ideas to improve or develop a community they will typically engage the community in some sort of a consultation process. Depending on the scale of a project, the community consultation process can be fairly short or very lengthy. You might find that for something relatively small scale, such as undertaking works to a park, the process might look like this:

However, in the case of a large, long-term project like The Bays, the community consultation looked like this:

The aim of a consultation process is to invite the community to provide feedback at different stages of the project. This helps to refine the plans for future change in the area.

Understanding The Problem

Step 1. Now that you understand the purpose of community consultation, you will be listening to other young people in your area to find out what is

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