Activity Introduction

Quick summary: In this integrated Drama and History lesson, students will engage with the story of Yanyuwa woman, Hilda Jarman Muir, a member of the Stolen Generations. They will respond to her story through group and class discussion. They will then explore and respond to a historical story from their own community, improvising some dramatic scenes about this story for performance before an audience of community members invited to the school. Students will benefit from her story and her influence as a positive role model who inspired many young Australians to believe in their power to bring about social change.

Created in partnership with education specialists, OfficeMax and the Teter Mek foundation: a national program around the preservation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. Products purchased from the OfficeMax Teter Mek range contribute to the funding of this program.

 

Learning intentions:

  • Students will understand who the Stolen Generations are.
  • Students will understand how to tell a story through drama.

21st century skills:

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Years 3 and 4 Drama

  • Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations and use empathy in their own improvisations and devised drama (ACADRM031)
  • Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032)

Year 3 (HASS) History

  • Sequence information about people’s lives and events (ACHASSI055)
  • Interact with others with respect to share points of view (ACHASSI059)
  • Present ideas, findings and conclusions in texts and modes that incorporate digital and non-digital representations and discipline-specific terms (ACHASSI061)

Year 4 (HASS) History

  • Sequence information about people’s lives and events (ACHASSI076)
  • Interact with others with respect to share points of view (ACHASSI080)
  • Present ideas, findings and conclusions in texts and modes that incorporate digital and non-digital representations and discipline-specific terms (ACHASSI082)

Syllabus outcomes: DRAS2.1, DRAS2.2, HT2-5.

General capabilities: Literacy, Critical and Creative Thinking, Personal and Social Capability, Ethical Understanding, Intercultural Understanding.

Cross-curriculum priority: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.

Relevant parts of Year 3 History achievement standards: Students identify individuals, events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present. Students sequence information about events and the lives of individuals in chronological order. Students develop texts, including narrative accounts, using terms denoting time.

Relevant parts of Year 4 History achievement standards: Students recognise the significance of events in bringing about change. Students describe the experiences of an individual or group in the past. Students sequence information about events and the lives of individuals in chronological order with reference to key dates. Students develop and present texts, including narrative recounts, using historical terms.

Relevant parts of Year 3 and 4 Drama achievement standards: Students use relationships, tension, time and place and narrative structure when improvising and performing devised and scripted drama. Students collaborate to plan, make and perform drama that communicates ideas.

Topic: NAIDOC Week. 

Unit of work: Celebrating Culture – Years 3-10

Time required: 120 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: High – The teacher will lead students through a presentation of the preliminary content. Students will need supervision and direction as they develop improvisations and perform dramatic scenes.

Resources required: Student Worksheets – one copy per student. Butchers paper and marker pens. Stolen Generations Information. Space for up to nine small groups to develop and rehearse a performance of a dramatic scene. This lesson also requires students to explore a historic story from your local area. You could choose to research this story with your students, or you could choose a story and present it to students. Check your local council, library or historical society for stories that might be interesting to students.

Keywords: Improvisation, drama, choreography, school performance, Stolen Generations, Hilda Jarman Muir, local history.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions:

  • Students will understand who the Stolen Generations are.
  • Students will understand how to tell a story through drama.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • ... improvise a dramatic scene and build a role play narrative structure.
  • ... find textual clues to help them sequence information about people’s lives.
  • ... work collaboratively.
  • ... express their own point of view and listen to the opinions of others.

Teacher content information: This resource was produced in partnership with the OfficeMax who is a proud supporter of the Teter Mek Foundation. The Teter Mek foundation is a national program around the preservation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. In this lesson, students will engage with the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women or groups of women, and celebrate the invaluable contributions they have made - and continue to make - to our communities, our families, our rich history and to our nat

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: Have you heard about the Stolen Generation?

Reading Hilda’s Story

Hilda Jarman Muir was born in 1920 near the Northern Territory outback town of Borroloola. Hilda was a Yanyuwa woman. When she was a young child, she ran barefoot through her Country, free as a bird. She laughed and played with the other children, her brothers and sisters, cousins and friends. Then one day when she was about eight years old, some white men came and took little Hilda away from her family. She was not allowed to see them or visit them at all. In fact, she was expected to forget all about them and live as a white Australian. This experience was very sad and difficult for Hilda, but she was a strong woman and learned how to survive even in such a terrible situation.

Years went by and Hilda grew to be a teenager. One of the worst things about being taken away was that Hilda lost her connection to Country. The land and waters of Borroloola are special to Hilda and her family. They have a

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