Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students explore the importance of problem finding in creating solutions to real world problems. They begin by identifying a range of problems they are aware of in the world around them and think about how they might begin to generate solutions to these problems. They are then introduced to the Global Problem Solvers (GPS) animated series, which will guide them through the problem finding and problem solving process. Finally students work collaboratively to research background information about the country their GPS series will focus on and create a factsheet about that place.

These lessons have been developed in partnership with Cisco. Cisco believes that our future will be defined by global problem solvers – global citizens ready to thrive in a connected and digital future by thinking like entrepreneurs, innovating like technologists, and acting as agents of social change.

Learning intentions: Students understand…

  • … what is meant by the term problem finding
  • … the relationship between problem finding and successful problem solving
  • … features and characteristics of a country outside of Australia (depending on GPS series).

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCritical ThinkingGlobal CitizenshipProblem FindingTeam Work    

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 3 HASS:

  • The main climate types of the world and the similarities and differences between the climates of different places (ACHASSK068)
  • The similarities and differences between places in terms of their type of settlement, demographic characteristics and the lives of the people who live there, and people’s perceptions of these places (ACHASSK069)
  • Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI053)
  • Record, sort and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different formats, including simple graphs, tables and maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI054)

Year 4 HASS:

  • The main characteristics of the continents of Africa and South America and the location of their major countries in relation to Australia (ACHASSK087)
  • Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI074)
  • Record, sort and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different formats, including simple graphs, tables and maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI075)

Year 5 HASS:

  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI095)
  • Organise and represent data in a range of formats including tables, graphs and large- and small-scale maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI096)

Year 6 HASS: 

  • Differences in the economic, demographic and social characteristics of countries across the world (ACHASSK139)
  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI123)
  • Organise and represent data in a range of formats including tables, graphs and large- and small-scale maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI124)

Syllabus outcomes: GE2-1, GE2-2, GE2-4, GE3-1, GE3-4.

General capabilities: Literacy.

Relevant parts of Year 3 HASS achievement standards: Students describe the characteristics of different places at local scales and identify and describe similarities and differences between the characteristics of these places. Students collect information from different sources to answer these questions. They record and represent data in tables and simple graphs and the location of places and their characteristics on labelled maps that use the cartographic conventions of legend, title and north point.

Relevant parts of Year 4 HASS achievement standards: Students describe and compare the characteristics of places in different locations at local to national scales. They locate, collect and sort information and data from different sources to answer these questions. They record and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in simple graphic forms, including large-scale maps that use the cartographic conventions of scale, legend, title and north point.

Relevant parts of Year 5 HASS achievement standards: Students locate, collect and organise data and information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions. They represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in graphic forms, including large-scale and small-scale maps that use the cartographic conventions of border, scale, legend, title and north point.

Relevant parts of Year 6 HASS achievement standards: Students describe and explain the diverse characteristics of places in different locations from local to global scales. They locate, collect and organise useful data and information from primary and secondary sources. They record and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different graphic forms, including large-scale and small-scale maps that use cartographic conventions of border, source, scale, legend, title and north point.

Topic: Enterprise Learning. 

This lesson is part of the wider units of work Cisco Global Problem Solvers – HASS – Years 3 & 4 and Cisco Global Problem Solvers – HASS – Years 5 & 6. 

Time required: 60 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – Oversee discussions and lead students in activities.

Resources required:

  • BOLTSS Mapping Conventions
  • Device capable of presenting a website to the class.
  • Enough sticky notes or small pieces of scrap paper (printed on one side is fine) so that each student can have between two and five (depending on age or ability)
  • Pens/pencils
  • Student Worksheet – one copy per student.

Keywords: Cisco, Global Problem Solvers, problem finding, problem solving.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students can... 

  • … understand what is meant by the term problem finding
  • … recognise the relationship between problem finding and successful problem solving
  • … recognise features and characteristics of a country outside of Australia (depending on GPS series).

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … work independently and collaboratively.
  • … participate in class discussions and brainstorming activities.
  • … conduct and communicate research.
  • … compare their own experiences with those of another country.

Teacher content information: The Global Problem Solvers are a team of teenage superheroes taking on our world's toughest problems. Developed by Cisco, this animated series supports your students through the steps of becoming problem solving superheroes. The series uses real world problems to support students in identifying and solving problems, in thinking about how technology can be used to solve seemingly intractable problems, and

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Student Worksheet

Thought Starter: Are you a problem finder?

Activating Prior Knowledge

In the first part of this lesson you will be thinking about what a ‘problem finder’ might be. Take some time to read the questions in the table below and record your answers in Column A.

Question Column A: My answer Column B: Further notes
What is a problem solver? 
How is a problem solver different to a problem finder? 
Why do you think we need both problem finders and problem solvers?

Global Problem Solvers

You will now create a factsheet about the setting for your Global Problem Solvers season. The factsheet could include:

  • A map (using BOLTSS Mapping Conventions)
  • Information about the main features and characteristics of the country you are looking at, and how some of these features and characteristics compare to Australia. You can use the following questions to guide your research:
    • Where is the season set (what is the location, where is it on the map)?
    • W
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