Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students investigate the questions we can ask to explore a problem. After reviewing prior knowledge, students look at some of the reasons why finding out the details of a problem is important to successfully solving that problem. Students then develop a series of problem finding questions based on set criteria. They test these questions on the information presented in the animated series Global Problem Solvers. After refining their questions, students create a graphic based on these questions that can be used to guide problem finding question generation throughout other lessons in this unit.

These lessons have been developed in partnership with Cisco. Cisco believes that our future will be defined by global problem solvers – global citizens ready to thrive in a connected and digital future by thinking like entrepreneurs, innovating like technologists, and acting as agents of social change.

Learning intention:

  • Students understand why defining a problem is important to successfully solving that problem
  • Students recognise the types of questions you can ask to find out about a problem.

21st century skills: 

   CommunicatingCritical ThinkingGlobal CitizenshipProblem FindingTeam Work

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 5 HASS

  • Develop appropriate questions to guide an inquiry about people, events, developments, places, systems and challenges (ACHASSI094)

Year 6 HASS

  • Develop appropriate questions to guide an inquiry about people, events, developments, places, systems and challenges (ACHASSI122)

Year 5 English

  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and sound appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1704)
  • Re-read and edit student’s own and others’ work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features (ACELY1705)

Year 6 English

  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, choosing and experimenting with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1714)
  • Re-read and edit students’ own and others’ work using agreed criteria and explaining editing choices (ACELY1715)

Syllabus outcomes: GE3-4, EN3-2A.

General capabilities: Critical and Creative Thinking.

Relevant parts of Year 5 HASS achievement standards: Students develop questions for an investigation. They work with others to generate alternative responses to an issue or challenge and reflect on their learning to independently propose action.

Relevant parts of Year 6 HASS achievement standards: Students develop appropriate questions to frame an investigation. They collaboratively generate alternative responses to an issue and use criteria to make decisions.

Relevant parts of Year 5 English achievement standards: Students create imaginative, informative and persuasive texts for different purposes and audiences. They edit their work for cohesive structure and meaning.

Relevant parts of Year 6 English achievement standards: Students create detailed texts elaborating on key ideas for a range of purposes and audiences, and make and explain editorial choices based on criteria.

Topic: Enterprise Learning. 

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work Cisco Global Problem Solvers – HASS – Years 5 & 6

Time required: 60 minutes.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – lead students in guided discussion, facilitate group activities.

Resources required:

Background Information – Season 2 factsheet, Generating Great Questions factsheet

  • Student Worksheet – one copy per student.

Keywords: Cisco, Global Problem Solvers, problem finding, questions, criteria.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will…

  • … understand why defining a problem is important to successfully solving that problem
  • … recognise the types of questions you can ask to find out about a problem.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … work independently and collaboratively
  • … participate in class discussions
  • ... generate questions to find out particular information
  • ... critically analyse their own work and make refinements.

Teacher content information: The Global Problem Solvers are a team of teenage superheroes taking on our world's toughest problems. Developed by Cisco, this animated series supports your students through the steps of becoming problem solving superheroes. The series uses real world problems to support students in identifying and solving problems, in thinking about how technology can be used to solve seemingly intractable problems, and in recognising opportunities for positive social change. In addition, each member of the Globa

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: “All problems become smaller when you confront them instead of dodging them” – William F. Halsey

Activating Prior Knowledge

Consider the following quote:

  • "If I were given one hour to save the planet, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute resolving it.” - Albert Einstein

Work in pairs to discuss and record your answers to the following question:

  • Why is it so important to define the problem?

GPS Problem Finders

When wanting to find out more about an issue it is useful to generate a range of questions that can help you identify the following:

  • Location of problem
  • People involved in the problem
  • Causes and consequences of the problem
  • Timeline/timeframe for the problem
  • Any wider or long-term consequences of the problem

Work in pairs/groups to develop a series of questions around each of these points. Test your questions against the list of things you should be aiming to find out about the problem by adding your questi

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