Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students explore the features of invertebrates using descriptive language. They begin by exploring the value of descriptive terms (adjectives) in describing unfamiliar objects. They are then introduced to invertebrates and work in groups to generate a list of descriptive words and terms for familiar invertebrates. Students then head outside to observe an invertebrate and work independently to observe and describe this invertebrate. They then team up with a classmate to share their descriptions and their classmate has to draw the invertebrate based on the description provided by their partner. Finally, students create a ‘Who Am I?’ text around their invertebrate.

This lesson has been developed with generous support from the Ian Potter Foundation, John T Reid Charitable Trusts and The Myer Foundation.

Learning intentions:

  • Students understand what an invertebrate is
  • Students understand the value of descriptive language in communicating ideas.

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCreative ThinkingCritical ThinkingTeam Work               

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 3 English

  • Use interaction skills, including active listening behaviours and communicate in a clear, coherent manner using a variety of everyday and learned vocabulary and appropriate tone, pace, pitch and volume (ACELY1792)
  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features and selecting print, and multimodal elements appropriate to the audience and purpose (ACELY1682)
  • Re-read and edit texts for meaning, appropriate structure, grammatical choices and punctuation (ACELY1683)

Year 3 Science

  • Living things can be grouped on the basis of observable features and can be distinguished from non-living things (ACSSU044)
  • Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using formal and informal representations (ACSIS060)

Year 4 English

  • Use interaction skills such as acknowledging another’s point of view and linking students’ response to the topic, using familiar and new vocabulary and a range of vocal effects such as tone, pace, pitch and volume to speak clearly and coherently (ACELY1688)
  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts containing key information and supporting details for a widening range of audiences, demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features (ACELY1694)
  • Re-read and edit for meaning by adding, deleting or moving words or word groups to improve content and structure (ACELY1695)

Year 4 Science

  • Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using formal and informal representations (ACSIS071)

Syllabus outcomes: EN2-1A, EN2-2A, ST2-10LW, ST2-4WS.

General capabilities: Literacy, Critical and Creative Thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.2.

Relevant parts of Year 3 English achievement standards: Students understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are used for different effects. Students create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations. They demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and punctuation appropriate to the purpose and context of their writing.

Relevant parts of Year 4 English achievement standards: Students explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context.

Relevant parts of Year 3 Science achievement standards: Students group living things based on observable features and use diagrams and other representations to communicate their ideas.

Relevant parts of Year 4 Science achievement standards: Students make and record observations with accuracy, and use formal and informal ways to communicate their observations and findings.

Topics: Biodiversity, Sustainability.

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work: Investigating Invertebrates – Lower Primary.

Time required: 90 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – lead students in discussions, oversee observations of invertebrates outdoors.

Resources required:

Keywords: invertebrates, adjectives, nouns, descriptive language, drawing.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will...

  • ... understand what an invertebrate is
  • ... understand the value of descriptive language in communicating ideas.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … use adjectives and nouns to describe invertebrates
  • … use communication skills to share and transcribe information about invertebrates
  • … identify invertebrates in the schoolyard
  • … work independently and collaboratively
  • … participate in class and group discussion.

Teacher content information: Many of us get the heebie-jeebies about creepy crawlies. Maybe that’s because there are so many of them. In fact, as a group, insects (one group of invertebrates) are the most populous animals on Earth: it is estimated that there are 200 million insects for every human on the planet!!!

Fear not, the earth is not in danger of being overrun by invertebrates. Instead, they are actually vital to the healthy functioning of almost every aspect of our natural environment. They w

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