Activity Introduction

Quick summary: In this lesson, students will learn about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) through the lens of the feature documentary, In My Blood It Runs. They will explore how children’s rights are upheld or ignored in Dujuan’s world and investigate the issue of Youth Detention in Australia. They will write an address to the United Nations advocating for children’s rights.

We recommend that before you teach this lesson, you have taught one or both of the first lessons in the sequence (Identity and Diverse Perspectives), accessed the free professional learning resource, which has been co-developed by Reconciliation Australia’s Narragunnawali team, and watched the film with your class. 

Learning intentions:

  • Students will understand all children have rights as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)
  • Students will critically evaluate whether all children in Australia have equal and equitable access to these rights
  • Students will understand the importance of actively listening to the voices and perspectives of children, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people, in the context of ensuring the rights enshrined in the UNCRC are upheld.

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCultural UnderstandingEmpathyEthical UnderstandingGlobal Citizenship

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 9 Civics & Citizenship

  • How and why individuals and groups, including religious groups, participate in and contribute to civic life (ACHCK079)
  • The influence of a range of media, including social media, in shaping identities and attitudes to diversity (ACHCK080)
  • Present evidence-based civics and citizenship arguments using subject-specific language (ACHCS088)
  • Reflect on their role as a citizen in Australian, regional and global contexts (ACHCS089)

Year 10 Civics & Citizenship

  • The Australian Government’s role and responsibilities at a global level, for example. provision of foreign aid, peacekeeping, participation in international organisations and the United Nations (ACHCK091)
  • How Australia’s international legal obligations shape Australian law and government policies, including in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACHCK093)
  • Critically evaluate information and ideas from a range of sources in relation to civics and citizenship topics and issues (ACHCS097)
  • Present evidence-based civics and citizenship arguments using subject-specific language (ACHCS101)
  • Reflect on their role as a citizen in Australian, regional and global contexts (ACHCS102)

Year 9 English

  • Explore and reflect on personal understanding of the world and significant human experience gained from interpreting various representations of life matters in texts (ACELT1635)
  • Analyse how the construction and interpretation of texts, including media texts, can be influenced by cultural perspectives and other texts (ACELY1739)
  • Create imaginative, informative and persuasive texts that present a point of view and advance or illustrate arguments, including texts that integrate visual, print and/or audio features (ACELY1746)

Year 10 English

  • Explore and reflect on personal understanding of the world and significant human experience gained from interpreting various representations of life matters in texts (ACELT1635)
  • Analyse and evaluate how people, cultures, places, events, objects and concepts are represented in texts, including media texts, through language, structural and/or visual choices (ACELY1749)
  • Create sustained texts, including texts that combine specific digital or media content, for imaginative, informative, or persuasive purposes that reflect upon challenging and complex issues (ACELY1756)

Syllabus outcomes: EN5-1A, EN5-7D, EN5-8D

General capabilities: Literacy, Ethical Understanding, Intercultural Understanding 

Cross-curriculum priority: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures (OI.6, OI.9) 

Relevant parts of Year 9 Civics and Citizenship achievement standards:
Students analyse a range of factors that influence identities and attitudes to diversity. They reflect on how groups participate and contribute to civic life.
Students develop and present evidence-based arguments on civics and citizenship issues using appropriate texts, subject-specific language and concepts.

Relevant parts of Year 10 Civics and Citizenship achievement standards:
Students explain how Australia’s international legal obligations influence law and government policy.
Students develop and present evidence-based arguments incorporating different points of view on civics and citizenship issues. They use appropriate texts, subject-specific language and concepts.

Relevant parts of Year 9 English achievement standards:
Students create texts that respond to issues, interpreting and integrating ideas from other texts. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, comparing and evaluating responses to ideas and issues.

Relevant parts of Year 10 English achievement standards:
Students create a wide range of texts to articulate complex ideas. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, building on others’ ideas, solving problems, justifying opinions and developing and expanding arguments.

Topic: Learning Through Film, Social Issues, Indigenous Education

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work In My Blood It Runs.

Time required: 100 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: High – facilitate class discussions and activities around complex issues.

Resources required:

  • Device capable of presenting a video to the class
  • Devices for students to conduct online research
  • Simplified version of the UNCRC – one printed or digital copy per student
  • Student Worksheet – one copy per student.

Keywords: In My Blood It Runs, film, film study, language, Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, children, rights, Indigenous, United Nations, UN, youth custody, detention, Don Dale, criminal responsibility.

Cool Australia would like to thank the In My Blood It Runs Advisory Committee who supported the writing of this resource. Special thanks to Alanna Raymond, Tessa Keenan, Stephanie Woerde, Esma Livermore and Julie Bover from Reconciliation Australia, Alex Shain from Shark Island, Maria Katsabanis from Australian Human Rights Commission, Renee Phillips from National Indigenous Youth Education Coalition, and Keren Shlezinger.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will…

  • … understand all children have rights as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)
  • … critically evaluate whether all children in Australia have equal and equitable access to these rights
  • … understand the importance of actively listening to the voices and perspectives of children, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people, in the context of ensuring the rights enshrined in the UNCRC are upheld.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … contribute actively to class and group discussions
  • … explain how Australia’s international legal obligations can influence law and government policy
  • … develop and present evidence-based arguments.

Teacher content information:

About the Film
In My Blood It Runs is an intimate and compassionate observational documentary from the perspective of a 10-year-old Aboriginal boy in Alice Springs (Mparntwe), Australia, who

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: “Our young people do not belong in prison.” ~ Mick Gooda

1. Watch this video about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC):

CRC30: For every child, every right (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QB1j7XAGpcs)

2. Answer the following questions in Column A, then talk to a partner and add any new ideas to Column B:

  A B
Why is it important that child rights are met and protected?
Why do you think it is important for young people to have their voices and perspectives actively listened to?

3. Complete the following table by adding examples where you have seen these rights upheld:

Article Evidence of rights being met Evidence of rights being denied
Article 12, Respect for Children’s Views
Article 29, Aims of Education
Article 30, Minority and Indigenous Groups

4. Watch the trailer for In My Blood It Runs then use the table below to record evidence of each listed right bei

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