Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students develop an understanding of the importance of native bees and propose actions to protect them. They begin by working collaboratively to undertake secondary research in order to create a class library about native bees. They then undertake primary research by completing a native bee survey at their school. Based on the results of their primary and secondary research, students propose actions to protect native bees at their school and produce a communication piece to share their ideas with the school community.

This lesson has been created in partnership with ACT for Bees. ACT for Bees is a not-for-profit organisation taking action to preserve these essential pollinators to ensure a food secure future.  

 

Learning intentions:

  • Students understand the difference between European honey bees and Australian native bees
  • Students recognise the value of native bees to both the natural environment and agriculture.

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCommunity EngagementCritical ThinkingProblem SolvingTeam Work               

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 5 Science

  • Living things have structural features and adaptations that help them to survive in their environment (ACSSU043)
  • Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS086)
  • Compare data with predictions and use as evidence in developing explanations (ACSIS218)
  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes using scientific representations in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS093)

Year 6 Science

  • Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS103)
  • Compare data with predictions and use as evidence in developing explanations (ACSIS221)
  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes using scientific representations in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS110)

Year 5 HASS

  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI095)
  • Evaluate evidence to draw conclusions (ACHASSI101)
  • Work in groups to generate responses to issues and challenges (ACHASSI102)
  • Reflect on learning to propose personal and/or collective action in response to an issue or challenge, and predict the probable effects (ACHASSI104)
  • Present ideas, findings, viewpoints and conclusions in a range of texts and modes that incorporate source materials, digital and non-digital representations and discipline-specific terms and conventions (ACHASSI105)

Year 6 HASS

  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI123)
  • Evaluate evidence to draw conclusions (ACHASSI129)
  • Work in groups to generate responses to issues and challenges (ACHASSI130)
  • Reflect on learning to propose personal and/or collective action in response to an issue or challenge, and predict the probable effects (ACHASSI132)
  • Present ideas, findings, viewpoints and conclusions in a range of texts and modes that incorporate source materials, digital and non-digital representations and discipline-specific terms and conventions (ACHASSI133)

Syllabus outcomes: ST3-10LW, ST3-4WS, GE3-4.

General capabilities: Literacy, Critical and Creative Thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.7, OI.9.

Relevant parts of Year 5 Science achievement standards: Students analyse how the form of living things enables them to function in their environments. They compare patterns in their data with predictions when suggesting explanations. They communicate their ideas and findings using multimodal texts.

Relevant parts of Year 6 Science achievement standards: Students collect, organise and interpret their data, and construct multimodal texts to communicate ideas, methods and findings.

Relevant parts of Year 5 HASS achievement standards: Students locate and collect data and information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions. They interpret data to identify and describe distributions, simple patterns and trends, and to infer relationships and suggest conclusions based on evidence. They work with others to generate alternative responses to an issue or challenge. They present their ideas, findings and conclusions in a range of communication forms.

Relevant parts of Year 6 HASS achievement standards: Students locate and collect useful data and information from primary and secondary sources. They interpret data to identify, describe and compare distributions, patterns and trends, and organise and represent data in a range of formats. They collaboratively generate alternative responses to an issue. They present ideas, findings, viewpoints and conclusions in a range of communication forms.

Topic: Biodiversity.

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work Love Food? Love Bees! – Integrated Unit – Years 5 & 6.

Time required: 180+ mins (will depend on the number of observation sites you have to visit, the number of times you visit each site, and the communication pieces students create and how you choose to share them).

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium to high – Supervise class discussions, oversee bee observation activities, lead students in creating communication pieces.

Resources required:

Keywords: native bees, school, observation, biodiversity, habitat, bee hotels, plants, communication.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will…

  • … understand the difference between European honey bees and Australian native bees
  • ... recognise the value of native bees to both the natural environment and to agriculture.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … distinguish between an Australian native bee and a European honey bee
  • … undertake primary and secondary research
  • … draw conclusions about research results, propose actions in response to results and communicate findings and proposed actions
  • … work collaboratively and independently.

Teacher content information:

About bees - Bees first appeared on Earth at least 80 million years ago. The ancestors of modern bee species lived alongside the dinosaurs - at a time when giant pines, cedars, tree ferns and cycads were the main plants and the air swarmed with primitive insects including oversized dragonflies and giant butterflies. During this time, the first flowering plants (angiosperms) appeared and a more e

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Student Worksheet

Thought-starter: Most Australian native bees are too small to deliver an effective sting.

Activating Prior Knowledge

Work independently to think about bees and record your responses to the following:

Three thoughts or ideas you have about bees -

1. 

2. 

3. 

Two questions you have about bees -

1. 

2. 

.

One concern or worry you have about bees -

1.

Secondary Research - Are All Bees The Same?

You will now work in groups to answer some or all of the following questions. The aim of answering these questions is to start collecting information for your class native bee library.

You will need to conduct research to find out the answers to these questions:

  • How many different types of native bees are Australian scientists aware of?
  • How many different types of European honey bees do we have in Australia?
  • How are native bees different to honey bees in terms of:
    • Appearance
    • How they live (solitary or social) and how this is reflected in the structure of hive/nest t
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