Activity Introduction

Students Orienteering Together Through the forestQuick summary: Students create a map of an area of their neighbourhood. Students begin by clarifying their understanding of key terms relating to this lesson and then work as a class to consider the information that standard maps (such as Google Maps) do or don’t contain, and work in groups to develop a series of questions to help guide their observations on a walk. They then take a walk around a part of their neighbourhood to identify and record key human-made, animal and environmental features. Back in the classroom, students work in groups or as a class to create a map of their neighbourhood that incorporates the features they identified. Finally, students reflect on how some of the features of their neighbourhood could be improved.

This can be completed as a stand alone lesson; however, if you have completed any of the previous Roots and Shoots lessons, students will have the opportunity to synthesise what they have already learned when planning their social action.

Jane Goodall's Roots and ShootsThis lesson has been developed in partnership with Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots program. Roots & Shoots is a global youth-led program of young people taking action to improve our world. By participating in this lesson, you and your students will be joining thousands of young people and teachers working to make positive change in our world.

Learning intentions:

  • Students understand the differences between human-made, animal and environmental features.
  • Students understand how a map can be used to portray a range of information.
  • Students understand how to create their own maps.

21st century skills:

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 3 HASS

  • Pose questions to investigate people, events, places and issues (ACHASSI052)
  • Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI053)
  • Record, sort and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different formats, including simple graphs, tables and maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI054)

Year 4 HASS

  • Pose questions to investigate people, events, places and issues (ACHASSI073)
  • Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI074)
  • Record, sort and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different formats, including simple graphs, tables and maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI075)

Year 5 HASS

  • Develop appropriate questions to guide an inquiry about people, events, developments, places, systems and challenges (ACHASSI094)
  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI095)
  • Organise and represent data in a range of formats including tables, graphs and large- and small-scale maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI096)

Year 6 HASS

  • Develop appropriate questions to guide an inquiry about people, events, developments, places, systems and challenges (ACHASSI122)
  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI123)
  • Organise and represent data in a range of formats including tables, graphs and large- and small-scale maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI124)

Syllabus outcomes: GE2-4, GE3-4.

General capabilities: Critical and Creative Thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.5.

Relevant parts of Year 3 HASS achievement standards: Students pose questions and locate and collect information from sources, including observations, to answer these questions. They record and represent data in different formats, including labelled maps using basic cartographic conventions.

Relevant parts of Year 4 HASS achievement standards: Students develop questions to investigate. They locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations to answer these questions. They sort, record and represent data in different formats, including large-scale maps using basic cartographic conventions. 

Relevant parts of Year 5 HASS achievement standards: Students develop questions for an investigation. They locate and collect data and information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions. They sort, record and represent data in different formats, including large-scale and small-scale maps, using basic conventions.

Relevant parts of Year 6 HASS achievement standards: Students develop appropriate questions to frame an investigation. They locate and collect useful data and information from primary and secondary sources and organise and represent data in a range of formats, including large- and small-scale maps, using appropriate conventions.

Topic: Social Issues, Outdoor Learning.

Unit of work: Roots & Shoots – Upper Primary.

Time required: 170+ mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: High – lead students in observing school yard and creating map.

Resources required: Student Worksheets – one copy per student. Device for taking photos, such as camera, tablet or phone. School map. Printed neighbourhood map of area being explored.  

  • Younger students – Printed map of part of your neighbourhood you want to explore (e.g. from Google Maps).
  • Older students – Device for accessing map-making program, such as a computer or tablet. Access to ZeeMaps.

Keywords: Mapping, community, neighbourhood, people, animals, environment, Jane Goodall, Roots & Shoots.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher preparation

Learning intentions:

  • Students understand the differences between human-made, animal and environmental features.
  • Students understand how a map can be used to portray a range of information.

Success criteria: Students can …

  • … collect data about their neighbourhood.
  • … identify and locate features on a map.
  • … annotate maps according to mapping conventions.
  • … work collaboratively.

Teacher content information: At the age of 26 Jane Goodall travelled to Gombe Stream National Park (in what is now Tanzania) to study the mysterious world of wild chimpanzees. Through her patience and persistence, she won the trust of the chimpanzees and was able to learn more about our closest living relatives than anyone else ever had. Both the public and the scientific community were fascinated by her findings, which forever changed the way we look at evolution and ourselves. Chimpanzees make and use tools and feel the same feelings we do, including love, jealousy an

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: "A sense of wonder is desperately important" - Dr. Jane Goodall

Reflection

Think back to the walk you took around your neighbourhood and answer the following questions:

1. What animal, human-made or environmental feature did you find most interesting or surprising or worrying?

 

 

2. Why does this stand out for you?

 

 

3. Imagine that you were to improve this feature – what would you do?

 

 

 

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