Activity Introduction

rl_boy-rockpool_istock-645284330_photoframeQuick summary: Through a student-led investigation, this lesson allows your class to understand why rockpools are important to marine and terrestrial species. To begin this lesson, students work in small groups to find common rockpool species. They then conduct a safety briefing before heading to a local rockpool for a ramble. Students work in pairs to find, observe and record rockpool species through scientific drawings. Years 5-6 students will consider the adaptations that enable these species to live in a rockpool environment. Students will then report their findings to their classmates. Finally, students will work as a class to collect and identify waste materials in and around the rockpools.

parks-victoria-and-vic-gov-horizontal-logoThis lesson is produced in partnership with Parks Victoria and is designed to be taught in a natural or outdoor setting. Before conducting this lesson, teachers need to locate a rockpool close to their school grounds. Contact your local council or parks department to find a rockpool near you.

 

Learning intentions:

  • Students will understand why rockpools are important to marine and terrestrial species and habitats. 
  • Students will understand that waste items in our oceans threaten all marine life, including those in rockpools.
  • Years 5-6 students will understand that species living in rock pools have particular adaptations that help them to survive in these difficult environments.

21st century skills:

critical-thinking_team-work_personal-and-social-skills

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions:

Year 4 Science

  • Living things depend on each other and the environment to survive (ACSSU073)
  • With guidance, identify questions in familiar contexts that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on prior knowledge (ACSIS064)

Year 4 Geography

  • The importance of environments, including natural vegetation, to animals and people (ACHASSK088)
  • Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI074)
  • Draw simple conclusions based on analysis of information and data (ACHASSI079)

Year 5 Science

  • With guidance, pose clarifying questions and make predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS231)
  • Living things have structural features and adaptations that help them to survive in their environment (ACSSU043).

Year 5 Geography

  • Locate and collect relevant information and data from primary sources and secondary sources (ACHASSI095)
  • Work in groups to generate responses to issues and challenges (ACHASSI102)

Year 6 Science

  • With guidance, pose clarifying questions and make predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS232)
  • The growth and survival of living things are affected by physical conditions of their environment (ACSSU094)

Year 6 Geography

  • Examine primary sources and secondary sources to determine their origin and purpose (ACHASSI126)
  • Work in groups to generate responses to issues and challenges (ACHASSI130)

Syllabus outcomes: ST2-2VA, ST2-4WS, ST2-11LW, ST3-2VA, ST3-4WS, ST3-10LWGE3-4, GE2-4

General capabilities: Critical and creative thinking, Personal and social capability.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.2, OI.9.

Relevant parts of Year 4 Science achievement standards: Students describe relationships that assist the survival of living things.

Relevant parts of Year 4 Geography achievement standards: Students develop questions to investigate. They locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations to answer these questions.

Relevant parts of Year 5 Science achievement standards: Students analyse how the form of living things enables them to function in their environments.

Relevant parts of Year 5 Geography achievement standards: Students develop questions for an investigation. They locate and collect data and information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions.

Relevant parts of Year 6 Science achievement standards: Students describe and predict the effect of environmental changes on individual living things.

Relevant parts of Year 6 Geography achievement standards: Students develop appropriate questions to frame an investigation. They locate and collect useful data and information from primary and secondary sources.

Topic: Student Rangers, Biodiversity.

Unit of work: Student Rangers Unit – Upper Primary.

Time required: 120 minutes (not including travel time to and from the rocky shore)

Level of teacher scaffolding: High – lead students in activity and discussion, ensure safety of students at all times.

Resources required: Map of the area you will be visiting (contact your local council or parks department for more information). Victorian-based teachers can utilse the following link from Parks Victoria to locate parks: Park locator map. Alternatively, Google Earth can also be used to explore your local area.

Personal protective equipmentActivity equipment

All Students:

  • UV protection (hat, sunscreen, long sleeves)
  • Polarised sunglasses
  • Insect repellent
  • Closed toe shoes that can get wet
  • Drinking water

Teacher:

  • First Aid Kit
  • Mobile phone
  • Hand sanitiser
  • Protective gloves
  • Bag for rubbish

 

One per student:

One per 2-4 students:

  • Computer or tablet with internet connection

 One per class:

  • Rockpools Factsheet – to be projected
  • Data projector or interactive whiteboard
  • Internet connection 

 

Keywords: Student Rangers, outdoor learning, rocky shore, rockpools, marine species, adaptations, plastic waste.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

rl_girl-rockpool_istock-179568846_photoframeTeacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students are introduced to the range of species living in along rocky shores, and their importance. Year 5-6 students understand that these species have particular adaptations that help them to survive in this difficult environments.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • ... identify some of the species that are found in rockpools along the rocky shore.
  • ... explain in their own words, the adaptations these species have to enable them to live in the rocky shore environment.
  • ... understand how plastic waste harms marine species.
  • ... undertake research online.
  • ... identify, observe and record marine species.
  • ... create a scientific drawing.

rl_learning-intentions-tip

Teacher content information: All around Australia you can find a wide variety of parks, reserves and waterways that are managed for conservation, recreation and other uses.

Parks, in particular national parks and conservation reserves, are important for protecting and conserving biodiversity (

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Student Worksheet

Thought starter: Why do we need to tread lightly around rockpools?

Reflection questions

Work independently to answer the following questions:

What did you enjoy about exploring the rock shores? What were the best bits?
What was the most interesting thing you saw or found out about rock shores and the animals that live there?
Why do you think scientists study species in the rockpools along rocky shores? Why might it be important?
What else would you like to know about what you saw in this lesson?
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