Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students explore the concept of a circular economy as a way of addressing the waste crisis. They begin by reviewing their understanding of waste and think about who is responsible for dealing with waste: governments, producers or consumers? They are then introduced to the National Waste Policy 2018 and the concept of a circular model of the economy. They then examine the National Waste Policy 2018, focusing on the five principles identified in the document for addressing waste management, recycling and resource recovery in a circular economy. Students use these principles to analyse companies which claim to operate within a circular economic model and share their findings with the class.

Cool Australia’s War On Waste lessons have been developed in partnership with Lune Media and with support from the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network. These lessons have been designed to lead students through a deeper understanding of some of the big issues relating to waste in Australia and to support them to take action to reduce the impact of waste on our environment. To access the full War On Waste unit for Years 7 to 10, click here.

Learning intentions:

  • Students recognise the impacts of waste on our environment
  • Students become familiar with the National Waste Policy 2018
  • Students understand what a circular economy model is and how it compares with a linear model
  • Students understand how a circular economy model could help to reduce the impact of waste on our environment.

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCritical ThinkingTeam Work                

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 8 Economics and Business

  • The ways markets in Australia operate to enable the distribution of resources, and why they may be influenced by government (ACHEK027)
  • Gather relevant data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES033)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar and new situations (ACHES036)
  • Present evidence-based conclusions using economics and business language and concepts in a range of appropriate formats, and reflect on the consequences of alternative actions (ACHES037)

Year 9 Economics and Business

  • The nature of innovation and how and why businesses seek to create and maintain a competitive advantage in the market, including the global market (ACHEK041)
  • The changing roles and responsibilities of participants in the Australian or global workplace (ACHEK042)
  • Gather relevant and reliable data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES044)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations (ACHES047)
  • Present reasoned arguments and evidence-based conclusions in a range of appropriate formats using economics and business conventions, language and concepts (ACHES048)

Year 10 Economics and Business

  • Factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions and the short- and long-term consequences of these decisions (ACHEK053)
  • Gather relevant and reliable data and information from a range of digital, online and print sources (ACHES056)
  • Apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations (ACHES059)
  • Present reasoned arguments and evidence-based conclusions in a range of appropriate formats using economics and business conventions, language and concepts (ACHES060)

Syllabus outcomes: C4.1, C4.2, C4.3, C4.4, C4.7, C4.8, C5.1, C5.2, C5.3, C5.4, C5.7, C5.8.

General capabilities: Literacy, Critical and Creative Thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.8.

Relevant parts of Year 8 Economics and Business achievement standards: Students explain how markets operate and recognise why governments may influence the market’s operation. They explain the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses in terms of financial and economic decision-making. Students develop questions and gather relevant data and information from different sources to investigate an economic or business issue. They apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts to familiar and unfamiliar problems.

Relevant parts of Year 9 Economics and Business achievement standards: Students analyse the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workplace. They gather and analyse relevant data and information from different sources to answer questions, identify trends and explain relationships. They apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts to familiar, unfamiliar and hypothetical problems.

Relevant parts of Year 10 Economics and Business achievement standards: Students analyse factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions and explain the short- and long-term effects of these decisions. They gather and analyse reliable data and information from different sources to identify trends, explain relationships and make predictions, and apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts to familiar, unfamiliar and complex hypothetical problems.

Topic: Waste, sustainability.

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work: War On Waste – Years 7-10.

Time required: 60 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – facilitate class discussions, lead students in activities.

Resources required:

Keywords: War On Waste, Impact Report, circular economy model, lineal economy model, waste.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will…

  • ... recognise the impacts of waste on our environment
  • ... become familiar with the National Waste Policy 2018
  • ... understand what a circular economy model is and how it compares with a linear model
  • ... understand how a circular economy model could help to reduce the impact of waste on our environment.

Success criteria: Students can…

  • … navigate, read and analyse a policy document
  • … use criteria to assess business practices
  • … work independently and collaboratively.

Teacher content information: In Australia, we began addressing the issue of waste in the 1960s and '70s with litter campaigns like Keep Australia Beautiful and Tidy Town Awards. With such a long history of waste reduction campaigns, you would think we had got on top of the waste issue; however, as the recent recycling crisis shows, we're still trying to solve the issue of waste in Australia.

Why is this the case? War On Waste, highlighted the c

...
 
- or - to view worksheets

Student Worksheet

Thought Starter: "If we could build an economy that would use things rather than use them up, we could build a future.” - Ellen MacArthur

Who Is Responsible For Waste?

Spend some time reading through the National Waste Policy 2018 and answer the following questions:

What is this document about?

Who is this document prepared by?

Who do you think this document has been prepared for?

Rethinking Waste

You will now take a closer look at the National Waste Policy 2018. You will work in groups to read through the document, ensuring that you divide the reading up between the members of your group. As you read you should aim to respond to each question as you are reading them:

Note down the key points in the section that you read (at least three)

 

Note down one thing that surprised you

Note down one thing that you didn’t understand

In your opinion, what is the intended impact of this policy?

What does this document say about who is responsible for addressing waste?

...
 
- or - to view worksheets

Leave your Feedback

We appreciate your feedback. Let us know what you like or don't like about this activity:

Sorry. You must be logged in to view this form.