Activity Introduction

Quick summary: Students think about an environmental issue that they would take action for. They work in groups to research this issue and create a presentation to share with the class. Students conduct a role-play activity to test this issue and explore the complexities involved in taking action for this issue.

Wild Things follows a new generation of environmental activists that are mobilising against forces more powerful than themselves and saying: enough. Following a year in the footsteps of School Strike 4 Climate, Stop Adani and Save The Tarkine Rainforest, interwoven with a look at historical campaigns, this film is set to show that every action counts and individuals can make a difference. Access the film here.

The lessons in this unit use the Wild Things documentary to guide students through the environmental movement in Australia, and support students in raising their own voices for an environmental issue that is important to them. We recommend this lesson is used as the third lesson in a sequence of learning within this unit.

Learning intentions:

  • Students identify the impacts of humans on our natural environment
  • Students recognise that different people have different ideas about how our natural resources should be used
  • Students recognise different forms of activism and why they might be used. 

21st century skills: 

CommunicatingCommunity EngagementCritical ThinkingGlobal CitizenshipProblem FindingProblem SolvingTeam Work                

Australian Curriculum Mapping

Content descriptions: 

Year 8 Civics and Citizenship

  • The freedoms that enable active participation in Australia’s democracy within the bounds of law, including freedom of speech, association, assembly, religion and movement (ACHCK061)
  • Appreciate multiple perspectives and use strategies to mediate differences (ACHCS071)

Year 9 Civics and Citizenship

  • Critically evaluate information and ideas from a range of sources in relation to civics and citizenship topics and issues (ACHCS084)
  • Recognise and consider multiple perspectives and ambiguities, and use strategies to negotiate and resolve contentious issues (ACHCS086)

Year 10 English

  • Understand how language use can have inclusive and exclusive social effects, and can empower or disempower people (ACELA1564)

Year 8 Geography

  • Human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)
  • Ways of protecting significant landscapes (ACHGK052)
  • Present findings, arguments and ideas in a range of communication forms selected to suit a particular audience and purpose; using geographical terminology and digital technologies as appropriate (ACHGS061)

Year 9 Geography

  • The effects of the production and consumption of goods on places and environments throughout the world and including a country from North-East Asia (ACHGK068)
  • Present findings, arguments and explanations in a range of appropriate communication forms, selected for their effectiveness and to suit audience and purpose; using relevant geographical terminology, and digital technologies as appropriate (ACHGS070)

Year 10 Geography

  • Human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability (ACHGK070)
  • Environmental world views of people and their implications for environmental management (ACHGK071)
  • Present findings, arguments and explanations in a range of appropriate communication forms, selected for their effectiveness and to suit audience and purpose; using relevant geographical terminology, and digital technologies as appropriate (ACHGS079)

Syllabus outcomes: GE4-2, GE4-3, GE4-5, GE4-7, GE4-8, GE5-2, GE5-3, GE5-4, GE5-8, EN5-5C

General capabilities: Critical and Creative Thinking.

Cross-curriculum priority: Sustainability OI.3, OI.8, OI.9.

Relevant parts of Year 8 Civics and Citizenship achievement standards: Students explain features of Australia’s democracy that enable active participation. They explain different points of view on civics and citizenship issues. When planning for action, students take into account multiple perspectives, use democratic processes, and develop solutions to an issue.

Relevant parts of Year 9 Civics and Citizenship achievement standards: Students reflect on how groups participate and contribute to civic life. They compare and account for different interpretations and points of view on civics and citizenship issues. When planning for action, students take into account multiple perspectives, use democratic processes, and negotiate solutions to an issue.

Relevant parts of Year 10 English achievement standards: Students explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development of cohesive and logical arguments.

Relevant parts of Year 8 Geography achievement standards: Students explain interconnections within environments and between people and places and explain how they change places and environments. They compare alternative strategies to a geographical challenge, taking into account environmental, economic and social factors. Students present findings, arguments and ideas using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies in a range of appropriate communication forms.

Relevant parts of Year 9 Geography achievement standards: They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and explain how these interconnections influence people, and change places and environments. Students synthesise data and information to draw reasoned conclusions. They present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and digital representations in a range of appropriate communication forms.

Relevant parts of Year 10 Geography achievement standards: Students identify, analyse and explain significant interconnections between people, places and environments and explain changes that result from these interconnections and their consequences. They analyse and synthesise data and other information to draw reasoned conclusions, taking into account alternative perspectives.

Topic: Sustainability.

This lesson is part of the wider unit of work Wild Things Years 8 to 10.

Time required: 60 mins.

Level of teacher scaffolding: Medium – facilitate class discussion, lead students in activities.

Resources required:

Keywords: activism, environment, sustainability, forests, fossil fuels, climate change.

Cool Australia’s curriculum team continually reviews and refines our resources to be in line with changes to the Australian Curriculum.

 

This lesson has been developed with the support of 360 Degree Films and the Garry White Foundation.

Worksheets

Teacher Worksheet

Teacher Preparation

Learning intentions: Students will...

  • ... identify the impacts of humans on our natural environment
  • ... recognise that different people have different ideas about how our natural resources should be used
  • ... recognise different forms of activism and why they might be used. 

Success criteria: Students can…

  • ... identify an environmental issue that is important to them
  • ... create a presentation
  • ... participate in a role-play activity
  • ... work collaboratively and independently.

Teacher content information: The history of the green movement in Australia is widely acknowledged to have begun with the green bans in Sydney in the 1970s and Tasmania's Franklin Dam project of the late 1970s/early 1980s. These campaigns both raised awareness of the value of our natural environment and the ability of people to come together to protest and demand change. Since then, the green movement has engaged with a range of environmental issues such as threatened s

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Student Worksheet

Thought Starter: "I’m really proud to be here (at the strike), I feel like my voice matters and to think that there are thousands of people all across the world doing the same thing as here is just incredible." - Milou Albrecht

Tuning In

In the documentary, we see the then-current Prime Minister Scott Morrison talking about how kids shouldn’t be activists; that they should be at school getting an education.

Wild Things - Scott Morrison (https://vimeo.com/531524967/696eabcd28)

1. What does this make you think?

2. How does make you feel? 

3. What would be your response?

Environmental Issues

Think of an environmental issue that is important to you. Write this issue here:

Once you have chosen an issue, it's time to start researching this issue in detail. Conduct research in order to answer the following questions about the issue you have chosen:

1. What are the environmental challenges relating to this issue?

2. In what ways is this issue relevant to your local area?

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