Most native bird species are losing their homes, even the ones you see every day

Author: Jeremy Simmonds, Alvaro Salazar, James Watson, Martine Maron
Date: October 29, 2019
Across parts of Australia, vast areas of native vegetation have been cleared and replaced by our cities, farms and infrastructure. When native vegetation is removed, the habitat and resources that it provides for native wildlife are invariably lost. Our environmental laws and most conservation ef...

The first step to conserving the Great Barrier Reef is understanding what lives there

Author: Tom Bridge, Andrea Quattrini, Andrew Baird, Peter Cowman
Date: September 15, 2020
Look at this photo of two coral skeletons below. You’d be forgiven for thinking they’re the same species, or at least closely related, but looks can be deceiving. These two species diverged tens of millions of years ago, probably earlier than our human lineage split from baboons and macaques. ...

The last ice age tells us why we need to care about a 2℃ change in temperature

Author: Alan N Williams, Chris Turney, Haidee Cadd and more
Date: February 25, 2020
The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that without a substantial decrease in our use of fossil fuels, we are on track for a global average increase of 2℃ in the next few decades, with extremes of between 3 to 6℃ at higher latitudes. But 2℃ doesn’...

The burn legacy: why the science on hazard reduction is contested

Author: Kevin Tolhurst
Date: February 20, 2020
When it comes to reducing the extent of bushfires, scientists disagree on the best way to do it. Hazard-reduction burning (also known as “prescribed burning” or “controlled burning”) is controversial and, depending on the scientific paper, it’s shown to either be effective or not work a...