Kid’s Can Make a Difference – Choose to Make the World a Better Place

Roots & Shoots is a global network of young people taking action to improve our world, making a difference in almost 100 countries.

Founded in 1991 by Dr. Jane Goodall, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots is a youth service program for young people of all ages. Their mission is to foster respect and compassion for all living things, to promote understanding of all cultures and beliefs, and to inspire each individual to take action to make the world a better place for people, other animals, and the environment.

Roots & Shoots is a global network of young people taking action to improve our world. It is a youth-led action program that is currently making a difference in over 50 countries. It builds on Dr. Jane’s legacy and vision of placing the power and responsibility for creating solutions to big challenges in the hands of the young people. 

We have lessons for lower and upper primary that can be used to support learning. Check them out below. 

 

It All Started as a Child’s Dream

In July 1960, at the age of 26, Jane Goodall  to Gombe Stream National Park in what is now Tanzania and courageously entered the mysterious world of wild chimpanzees. She was equipped with little more than a notebook, binoculars, optimism and desire to learn more about these incredible animals.

Through patience and persistence, she won the trust of the chimpanzees and eventually learnt more than anyone else on earth ever had about our closest living relatives. The public was fascinated by her findings, which changed the way that we look at evolution and ourselves forever.

This short video highlights Roots & Shoots, the global youth program of the Jane Goodall Institute which was founded by Dr. Jane Goodall and Tanzanian students in 1991.

 

Roots and Shoots Exciting New Nature Education Program!

The Roots & Shoots Resource Box is a new FREE initiative of the Jane Goodall Institute of Australia (JGIA). This curriculum-linked, action-based nature education program aims to engage students, their families, and the community about our wildlife plus the natural environment. We aim to promote optimism for our future by encouraging young people to become environmental champions!

The Resource Box is designed for use by primary school teachers to share life-long lessons with our children. It is full of fabulous FREE resources, including:

Four beautiful books:

  • Local Safari: Fun, ethical and hands-on activities to inspire environmental champions
  • Amazing Australia: Explore the unique relationships between Australia’s spectacular wildlife and their environments
  • What on Earth?: Meet the weirdest, wildest and most wonderful animals on the planet!
  • Incredible Earth: Discover the fantastic geographical marvels of the world
  • Information about the wonderful WOODiWILD tree-planting project; and
  • Teachers Guide and Resources on how to get involved, ideas and lesson plans.

The Resource Box is funded with support from the Phillips Foundation. There will be no charge for this exciting resource for teachers and is limited to 4000 (one per school). Boxes will be delivered in October 2020.

Please Note: Parents who are homeschooling are eligible, however we will ask you to submit completed education action plans to receive your box. Insert ‘Homeschool’ in the School field and provide your relevant address details.

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Lower Primary Lessons

If you have received your Resource box, download this guide for use alongside the lessons

Observe Your School Environment

Take Action

Celebrate!

Tuning In To Animals, People & Environment

HASS

Students participate in a mapping exercise, working as a class to create a map of the human-made, animal & environmental features of their school. Students begin by clarifying their understanding of key terms, and then work as a class to walk around the school identifying & recording key human-made, animal & environmental features. 

HASS

Students develop a social action project to address a problem they have noticed at their school. Students begin by looking at the problems that are in their school, why these have occurred and what actions they could take to address the problem. They then select one action and develop and implement a social action project relating to that action.

 

HASS

Students analyse, reflect on and celebrate their social action project. Students begin by sequencing a range of assets produced throughout their project, and then assess the success of the project and reflect. Students then think about what further actions they can take to improve their community, and create a poster that describes their idea.

Science, HASS, English

Students will explore the question ‘What kind of world do we live in?’ They will view media that prompts them to think about interactions between people, animals & the environment and the impact of our choices & actions. students will develop awareness of significant world issues that are relevant to sustainability, the environment & animal welfare.

Exploring Habitats

Threatened and Endangered Animals

Endangered Data

Science, HASS, English

Students explore the ways in which various actions or occurrences can impact an environment. They begin by engaging with the story The Great Kapok tree and consider the way people, animals and plants interact within an environment. They will then explore different kinds of habitats and environments, and consider the impact different events would have on them

Science, HASS, English

Students focus on threatened species – what it means for a species to be labelled threatened, how they become threatened and what people can do to assist. They explore animals of the world, then identify endangered species within the Australasian region. They then participate in a range of hands on rotation activities focusing on the fight to save the Greater Bilby.

Maths, Science, HASS

Students will explore the population numbers for key Australian endangered species through an outdoor conservation trail, with the data presented as a column graph. They will then have the opportunity to analyse and interpret the information found and suggest ways in which these endangered species could be protected.

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Upper Primary Lessons

If you have received your Resource box, download this guide for use alongside the lessons

Observe Your Neighbourhood

Take Action

Celebrate!

Tuning In To Animals, People & Environment

HASS

Students create a map of an area of their neighbourhood. Students begin by understanding key terms, and work in groups to develop questions to help guide their walk. They then take a walk to identify and record key human-made, animal and environmental features.  Finally, students reflect on how some of the features of their neighbourhood could be improved.

 

HASS

Students develop a social action project to address a humanitarian or environmental issue they have noticed in their neighbourhood. Students begin by looking at the problems they have noticed, then they select one problem and brainstorm ideas around taking action to address this problem. They then select one action and develop and implement a social action project around this action. 

HASS

Students analyse, reflect on and celebrate their completed social action project. Students begin by sharing the assets they made, as well as the overall success of the project. Students then reflect upon their involvement in their social action project, and think about what further actions they would like to take. Finally, students celebrate their project and share their experiences with the community. 

Science, HASS

Students will explore the big challenges facing our world, such as climate change and waste. They will note the interconnectedness of people, animals and nature. They then focus on the context of plastic as an example of the devastating effect the choices people make, They will explore how plastic is formed, what we use it for and where it goes once we have finished with it.

Consuming Our World

What Should I Buy?

What Makes A Great Leader?

Exploring Community Data

Science, HASS

Students explore what it means to be a consumer and how the choices they make as a consumer can impact people, animals and the environment. They begin by developing their understanding of needs and wants and evaluating what things people really need. They then explore the impact of the consumption of a range of products on other people, animals and the environment.

Science, HASS

Students explore and discuss what factors should be considered when deciding to make a product purchase. They discuss the production, transportation and disposal of various items and the impact their choices have. They will then work collaboratively to develop a criteria sheet which can be used to determine which products are the most ethical and sustainable to purchase.

HASS, Civics & Citizenship

Students will explore what it means to be a compassionate leader and the skills and traits compassionate leaders have. Students will research, create and present a slideshow to the class about an inspirational leader from Australia or from around the world. They will also have the opportunity to reflect on their own leadership skills and traits.

Science, HASS, Maths

Students will select a particular environmental or conservation related issue and collect data to show how the choices and behaviours of members of the school community contribute to the issue. They will work to select an issue, identify key facts, develop survey questions and carry out the survey. Students will then collate, present and share their data with the class.

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About this Project

Jane Goodall's Roots and ShootsThese lessons has been developed in partnership with Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots program. Roots & Shoots is a global youth-led program of young people taking action to improve our world. By participating in these lessons, you and your students will be joining thousands of young people and teachers working to make positive change in our world.

 

Cool Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and recognise the continuing connection to land, water and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, and to Elders past and present. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that this website may contain images or names of people who have since passed away.

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