Healthy Eating Resources & Impacts of Sugar

These great lessons let you integrate health across the curriculum with a focus on the impact of sugar. Developed in partnership with SugarByHalf, this set of lessons aims to empower students to make informed food choices.

The World Health Organisation says that for good health, we should limit our daily added sugar intake to 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day. On average, Australians consume 14-16 teaspoons per day. Teenagers consume more than 20. Eating too much added sugar is a key driver of serious health problems including obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay, dementia and mental health conditions. A poor diet also puts children behind their peers, affecting brain development, sleep and ability to learn.

The different units help students to identify and understand the science of sugar, its impact on their body and the social and economic influences on their own food choices.

Many of these lessons are aligned to the New Zealand Curriculum. If you would like to see more Email us and let us know which lessons you would like our education team to align first.

Early Learning and Primary Education Resources

Guardian of the Gums – Early Learning to Year 2

Maths, Science, Health, English, Arts
Introducing – Guardians of the Gums! An engaging team of plaque-fighting superheroes with plenty of tips on how to protect your teeth from sugary attacks.

Sugar and Healthy Kidneys – Foundation to Year 2

Science, HPE
Teach students how to recognise foods containing added sugars, the role of our kidneys in the body and the effect of consuming too much sugar on the health of our kidneys.

Meet Your Kidneys
– Years 3 & 4

English, Mathematics, Health, Science
Learn how sugars are produced in nature, explore the function of the kidneys, and the choices they can make to enable them to grow up with healthy, well-functioning kidneys.

Sugar And Healthy Kidneys – Years 5 & 6

English, Mathematics, Health, Science
Teach students how to recognise foods containing added sugars, the role of our kidneys in the body and the effect of consuming too much sugar on the health of our kidneys.

The Social and Economic Impact of Sugar – Years 5 & 6

HASS
Directed at younger students, this unit investigates the social and economic factors surrounding sugar.

Understanding the Nutritional Information Panel
– Years 5 & 6

Maths
Students explore some of the ways that Australian plants are adapted to bushfires. They begin by reviewing their prior knowledge of how plants respond to fire, before exploring and defining the term ‘adaptation’.

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Secondary Education Resources

Body Science: The What, Where and Why
– Years 7 & 8

HPE
Teach students the science of sugar: what it is, where it comes from, and what it does to the body if you have too much. Students are encouraged to make smart, healthy decisions about what they consume.

The Influence of Advertising on Sugar Consumption
– Years 9 & 10

English
This unit looks to how sugary products are marketed and sold, in support of the English curriculum. It encourages students to critically consider advertising messages within their own environment.

Sugar, Acids and Tooth Decay
– Years 9 & 10

Science
Explore the way sugar increases your risk of cavities and tooth decay. Cover the familiar topic of acids and bases with a social action twist.

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With Thanks to Our Partners

Who are SugarByHalf?

A not-for-profit organisation, SugarByHalf promote action to reduce sugar-related diseases so that Australians live better, stronger and healthier lives.

Their message is simple: to reduce added sugar consumption by half. Eating too much added sugar is a key driver of serious health problems including obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay, dementia and mental health conditions. A poor diet also puts children behind their peers, affecting brain development, sleep and ability to learn. Poor diet choices ultimately mean that this generation of children could be the first in modern history to live shorter lives than their parents.

Much of the added sugar in our diet comes from the processed foods and drinks we consume. On average, Australians consume 14-16 teaspoons of added sugar per day. Teenagers consume more than 20 teaspoons per day. The World Health Organisation says we should limit our daily added sugar intake to 6 teaspoons for good health. To put that in perspective, there are 4 grams of sugar in one teaspoon. If something has 20 grams of sugar, that’s 5 teaspoons of sugar. 

Who are the Australian Dental Association?

As well as representing dentists, the Australian Dental Association (ADA). engages in health promotion and education with one of the main objectives of the ADA being to encourage the improvement of the oral and general health of the public. If you are looking for further tips around improving your oral health or that of your class, consider looking through the ADA website, which includes fact sheets, educational videos, and other helpful resources. You could also consider planning an event for Dental Health Week, which takes place in the first full week of August.

Who are Filter Your Future?

Filter Your Future (www.filteryourfuture.com.au) guides children towards positive lifestyle choices to reduce the impact of preventable chronic diseases on future generations. Not many people are aware that type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure account for half the chronic kidney disease cases in Australia. When children learn about the function of the kidneys to clean the blood, balance water and salts and remove waste from the body, they understand and are more motivated to follow a healthier lifestyle.

Filter Your Future’s vision is that young students are provided with evidence about the global health epidemic of weight-related chronic diseases and are empowered to make better lifestyle choices for a healthier future.

 

 

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, and to Elders past and present. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that this website may contain images or names of people who have since passed away.