Earth Hour 27 March 2020   #CONNECT2EARTH

 

Turn Earth Hour from a once off moment to a year round movement – our resources let you build storytelling and action at the community level.

Earth Hour is the world’s largest community-driven climate change campaign. At the centre of Earth Hour is switching off lights to show a commitment to taking action. Thousands of teachers use Earth Hour’s education program to enrich their curriculum and provide pathways for young people to create change in their world.

 

FREE TEACHER AND STUDENT RESOURCES

Early Learning curriculum lessons

Primary curriculum lessons

Secondary curriculum lessons

Student / Teacher Digital Library

 

 

 

 


Have you typed #Australia into Twitter lately? 

Over the last year, lots of teachers shared stories with our Cool Australia team. We have heard about passionate students, who are interested in climate change, sustainability and the environment. 

We have also heard you tell us how challenging it can be to bring real-world topics like climate change into the classroom.  We are pretty sure the 2020 school year will bring many more classroom conversations and, while we don’t have all of the answers, we definitely have some great resources to support teachers.

Check our some of our Professional Development courses for teachers and Australian curriculum-aligned lessons to support teachers in bringing real-world topics into the classroom. 

Are you ready for the classroom conversations in 2020?

 

        #AUSTRALIA      #CLIMATE    #COOLBURNING     

     #EDUCATION      #TEACHER DEVELOPMENT      

 

Cool Burning PD and Lessons

 

Climate Change and Sustainability in the Classroom

Primary Teachers

 

Cool Australia focuses on positive action when discussing climate change with primary school students. Our lessons are designed to empower students with information, letting them embrace the topic and create actionable change. 

 

 

 

 

Climate Change for Primary

 

2040 – For Primary Students

 

Roots & Shoots 

Years 1 & 2, Year 3 & 4, Years 5 & 6

 

Years 5 & 6

 

Lower Primary, Upper Primary

Younger children explore the science behind aspects of climate change and have the chance to take action.
Older primary students get to explore fires, renewable energy and climate change’s impact on animals. 

 

2040 is a story of hope that looks at the very real possibility that humanity could reverse global warming and improve the lives of every living thing in the process. It is a positive vision of what ‘could be’ that will give your students hope for the future.

 

Students can explore the interconnectedness of animals, people and environment. Older students investigate waste and consumer choice, while lower primary lessons focus on habitats and biodiversity. 

Lessons cover Science, Visual Arts, Maths and Geography

 

Lessons cover English, Design & Technology,
Science and HASS

 

Lessons cover English, Science, Maths,
Civics & Citizenship and HASS

 

Professional Development

 

Not sure how to take these lessons into the classroom? Our quick and easy professional development courses link curriculum lessons to PD coursework and help support teachers tackling real world content in the classroom. Courses are 1-2 hours and can be completed at your leisure.

 

  

 

 

Teach the Big Picture of Sustainability

 

Investigate How Animals Are Impacted by Their Environment

 

Introduce Primary Students to Design Thinking

Course Length: One Hour

 

Course Length: Two Hours

 

Course Length: Two Hours

Find out how to teach sustainability by opening your students’ minds to how different systems – environmental, social and economic – are interconnected.

 

Boost geography and science in primary and secondary by exploring how animals adapt to climate change. Thanks to our partner, WWF-Australia

 

Use a designer’s toolkit to help primary students find innovative solutions to big challenges.

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Secondary Teachers

 

Cool Australia focuses on positive action when tackling climate change with all students. Our lessons are designed to empower students with information, let them embrace the topic and create actionable change. 

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Citizen Science – Understanding Climate
Change and Phenology

 

New Citizen Science Lesson
Mangrove Watch

 

2040 – For Secondary Students

Years 7 & 8

 

Years 9 to 12

 

Years 9 & 10

Students use critical thinking and problem solving skills to explore the issues of climate change and its impact on biodiversity. 

 

MangroveWatch is a citizen science program hosted by Earthwatch Australia and James Cook University.

The program provides tools, methods and training to assist students to gather data on Australia’s tidal wetlands.

 

2040 is a story of hope that looks at the very real possibility that humanity could reverse global warming and improve the lives of every living thing in the process. It is a positive vision of what ‘could be’ that will give your students hope for the future. If you haven’t seen this film, you should. 

Find more Citizen Science Lessons

 

Check out all Years 9 & 10 Citizen Science

 

Lessons cover English, Design & Technology, Science and HASS

 

Professional Development

 

Not sure how to take these lessons into the classroom? Our quick and easy professional development courses link curriculum lessons to PD coursework and help support teachers tackling real world content in the classroom. Courses are 1-2 hours and can be completed at your leisure.

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Use Discussion Circles in the Secondary Classroom

 

Fit Sustainability into the Secondary Curriculum

 

Inspiring Students to Take Action

Course Length: Two Hours

 

Course Length: One Hour

 

Course Length: Two Hours

Learn how to actively involve students in discussions that allow them to express personal views and reflect on learning.

 

Sustainability helps answer the question, “Why are we learning this?” Find out how to integrate it into your curriculum with this online PD.

 

Help your students become change-makers in their community by following these steps for planning and implementing social action.

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Research Focus: Teaching Cool Burning in the Classroom

 What’s so cool about ‘cool burning’?

 

For tens of thousands of years Australian Aboriginal peoples have actively managed the savanna using fire. Their knowledge of the seasons and local conditions enable them to produce the most effective cool burns. These cool burns benefit both the environment and the Aboriginal traditional way of life.

Our teacher PD lets you build confidence in teaching Indigenous topics, and lets you make learning relevant by connecting to land management in your local area. These resources allow students to explore the use of cool burns as a way to manage country and how Indigenous Australians are the knowledge keepers of fire.

 

Primary Teachers

Secondary Teachers

Teach Caring for Country Using Fire

Cool Burning – For Primary Students

Teach Indigenous Land Management
Using Fire

Cool Burning – For Secondary Students

Explore Aboriginal Histories and Cultures in Years 3-6 through the stories of traditional owners and the fire-stick techniques they use to care for the land.

Course Length: Two Hours

In this learning unit, your students will investigate the way that Indigenous Australian land managers conduct controlled burns during the cool season of Australia’s tropical savanna regions. These land managers are also sharing their knowledge with scientists so that everyone can care for Country. 

Incorporate Aboriginal Histories and Cultures in Year 7-10 Geography by exploring how traditional owners are using fire to manage the land.

Course Length: Two Hours

In this fascinating study, students investigate the ancient land management strategy of burning off dangerous fuel loads in Australia’s tropical savanna regions. Students will explore and develop their understanding of new concepts, then use and consolidate their new knowledge to form their own conclusions about cool burning.

 

Cool Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, and to Elders past, present and emerging. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that this website may contain images or names of people who have since passed away.

 

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